Central Coast winemaking pioneer Ken Volk retires and lists winery for sale

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After four decades of winegrowing on the Central Coast, industry legend Ken Volk has announced his retirement and put his winery and brand up for sale, according to a news release Monday in Wine Business

The listing price, according to real estate Broker Jenny Heinzen, is $3.7 million. More details and photos are available at http://www.jennyheinzen.com/winery-buyer-registration

Kenneth Volk Vineyards is located in the original Byron Winery on Tepusquet Road in the Santa Maria Valley AVA. Founded by Dale Hampton, John Donovan and partner Ken Brown, the property and brand were acquired by Robert Mondavi in 1990.

The landmark, 25,000-plus case winery and tasting room are located at the same site, 5230 Tepusquet Rd.

Volk, most notably the founder of Wild Horse Winery & Vineyards in Templeton, purchased the Tepusquet Road property 12 years ago after he sold the Wild Horse property and brand to Peak Wines International (a subsidiary of Jim Beam Brands Worldwide Inc).

Long dedicated to the Central Coast wine growing region, Volk has been instrumental in putting the region on the world’s viticulture map, and bringing international awareness to the unique grape growing climates hidden within Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey and San Benito Counties.

Volk has an extensive legacy in the Central Coast wine world, having been the first president of the Paso Robles Grape Growers Association in 1982. He also served as chairman of the board of the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance from 1997 to 2001. After establishing Kenneth Volk Vineyards, Volk served two terms on the Board of Directors of the

Courtesy photo/A bird’s eye view of Ken Volk Vineyards winery and tasting room on Tepusquet Road in the Santa Maria Valley.

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A wine and viticulture education advocate, Volk also helped fund the pilot winery at his alma mater, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and served as the Chairman of the Industry Advisory Council for 10 years.

He has trained and mentored countless successful winemakers and industry professionals over the past four decades.

Of his retirement, Volk said: “It’s really two-fold. After suffering a stroke three years ago, I continue to face some on-going challenges with my health that prevent me from going to the winery on a daily basis.

“Additionally, like many of my colleagues who started family-owned wineries, my children have their own successful careers outside of this industry. I look forward to seeing a buyer take the brand to the next level.”

In addition to the winery and tasting room, the Kenneth Volk Vineyards property includes native gardens, a tranquil creek, event areas, a commercial kitchen and extensive office space. More than four acres of adjacent fallow land would be ideal for pinot noir and chardonnay.

Volk attributes the success of his flagship wine grapes, chardonnay and pinot noir, to the coastal maritime climate of the Santa Maria Valley, the resulting longer hang times, and the region’s well-draining soils.

 

Solvang’s Wandering Dog Wine Bar celebrating 10-year anniversary

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Solvang’s Wandering Dog Wine Bar, one of the region’s first to focus on wines from the Central Coast and around the world, will celebrate its 10th anniversary this month with various promotions and events.

Charles “CT” Williams and his wife, Jody, co-own Wandering Dog with his parents, Susan and Jack Williams. CT and his parents, residents of the Santa Ynez Valley since 1988, are longtime champions of the regions’ two main businesses — wine and tourism.

They established the bar to support and showcase winemakers with limited production and labels who could not afford their own tasting room. The “Dog’s” location was chosen to fill a void in what then was the quiet “west end” of Solvang, they  said.

Wandering Dog Wine Bar has made a name for itself by carrying under-the-radar labels, and by specializing in boutique wines. As Santa Barbara Wine Country expanded and evolved, so has Wandering Dog’s business: Today the bar offers international wine imports, domestic wines from areas other than Santa Barbara, craft beers from all over the world, as well as the Williams’ private label wine program – one that started with only four labels, and now boasts a line-up of 12-14 wines at any given time.

Starting this month and continuing through 2017, Wandering Dog will offer $10 by-the-glass wine specials, each month featuring a different wine. The first month’s special will be Wandering Dog’s proprietary 2014 “Leila” Pinot Noir, the first wine that Wandering Dog ever produced under its private label program.

Wandering Dog Photo/Wandering Dog has produced its own wine label since 2005. The wines are crafted by Norm Yost of Flying Goat Cellars.

The first vintage of the “Leila” Pinot Noir was 2005, crafted for Wandering Dog by winemaker Norm Yost of Flying Goat Cellars, who remains the winemaker for the label.

This Saturday, April 8, Wandering Dog will host its official anniversary party at Solvang’s Hans Christian Andersen Park (633 Chalk Hill Road). The family-friendly barbecue will include children’s games and a kids’ menu, as well as food, wine and beer for the “bigger kids.” Reservations are required, and tickets tickets can be purchased through Eventbrite, at www.eventbrite.com/e/wandering-dog-wine-bar-10-year-anniversary-party-tickets-32546874578 The cost is $10 per person and $5 for kids ages 2 to 10.

The event begins at 1 p.m. and will last until 4 p.m.

Starting in 2016, bar patrons were able to enjoy o-owners Jody and CT Williams’s newest venture, “Broken Clock Vinegar Works,” a line of drinking vinegars, available at the bar as a tasting or as individual-purchase shrub “cocktails.”

The story I wrote for Noozhawk.com about Broken Clock is available here

Daily offerings also include a dozen wine flights ranging from local favorites to sparkling and sweet wines, to reserve flights featuring wines that retail for more than $100 per bottle. Beer fans may partake in Wandering Dog’s offering of craft brew bottles. The bar also features gourmet cheese and charcuterie platters available in a variety of sizes, along with local olives and fine chocolates.

Knowing how the bar’s knowledgeable staff encourages guests to try new wines, I learned years ago to tell CT only to “surprise me” when he took my order. Through his expertise, I sampled sauvignon blanc from Oregon, Italian Barolo and many a terrific syrah.

The longtime “Blind Tasting” from 4 to 7 p.m. every Thursday challenges patrons to match up regions, varietals, alcohol percentages, price points and vintages of four featured red wines.

Another regular feature is the bar’s Wine-by-the-Glass loyalty card program (buy 10 glasses; get one free) and often, wine classes. Wandering Dog also arranges wine travel tours open to its dedicated wine club members, as well as to the general public.

New to Wandering Dog is the Monday “Game Night” from 4 to 7 p.m., during which guests may relax with $5 specials on a select white wine, select red wine, select “shrubtail”  and select beer, while they entertain themselves with games like Yahtzee, Backgammon, Chinese Checkers, Dominos and more.

CT Williams recalled that, in 2007, when the Williams’ family opened Wandering Dog, “Solvang had numerous empty storefronts, and the food and wine scene was not nearly as thriving as it is today. But we felt that our wine bar model could be just what was missing, and we bravely opened in the hopes that we might spur more business in our corner of the (Santa Ynez) Valley.”

His wife, Jody, director of events and marketing, continued: “We love this location. The majority of our business is tourists, and this end of town has a heavy concentration of hotels. Guests looking for something to do in the evenings need only walk a few steps to Wandering Dog. Even from our early days, we’ve been open later than a good portion of Solvang businesses, which has also helped to build our local following and our fan base from within the wine industry.”

Wandering Dog Wine Bar is located at 1539-C Mission Drive (next to Paula’s Pancake House).

Its hours are from 1 to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday; from 1 to 10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday. Phone: (805) 686-9126. Web: https://www.wanderingdogwinebar.com

 

 

 

Women winemakers, chefs to celebrate International Women’s Day with dinner

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Tenley Fohl Photography/ Karen Steinwachs, general manager and winemaker at Buttonwood Farm Winery & Vineyards and winemaker/owner of Seagrape Wine Co., is organizing the March 8 event at K’Syrah Catering in Solvang.

On Wednesday, March 8, more than a dozen of Santa Barbara County’s women winemakers will gather around tables in solidarity and camaraderie to celebrate International Women’s Day with wine, cuisine and good company.

The evening runs from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at K’Syrah Catering & Events’ new venue, 478 4th Place in downtown Solvang.

Tickets, at $75 each, are all-inclusive and available via https://womenwinemakersdinner.eventbrite.com

Only 75 tickets will be sold, which guarantees attendees and intimate evening with winemakers and chefs.

The evening will benefit the Women’s Fund of Northern Santa Barbara County.

The dozen-plus female winemakers will be joined by some of the Santa Ynez Valley’s most inventive female chefs, who are creating a five-to-seven course meal to pair with their colleagues’ wines.

Among the wineries participating as of today are Buttonwood, Cambria, Casa Dumetz, Cebada, Dreamcote, Fiddlehead, Harrison-Clark, Kitá, La Montagne, Lepiane, Lumen, Nagy, Rideau, Rusack, Sanford, Story of Soil and William James Cellars. Additional wineries are expected to join up in coming weeks.

Creating the menu will be Chef Pink of Bacon & Brine, Chef Brooke of the Union Hotel, Cheese monger Janelle McAtamney and Baker Amy Dixon of The Baker’s Table.

While the national percentage of female winemakers is about 10 percent, Santa Barbara has a much higher rate of women winemakers — nearly double the national average.

Despite its reputation as a glamorous and romantic industry, winemaking is hard, dirty work.

A typical day during harvest requires rising before the sun, hauling wine hoses and wrangling barrels in the cellar, all the while utilizing sensory skills to craft balanced and elegant wines.

At day’s end, winemakers swap boots and jeans for business attire and hit the road to sell their wares across the nation Many women winemakers accomplish all of this while raising families and staying active within their communities.

“International Women’s Day has traditionally focused on labor and work conditions,” said participating winemaker Karen Steinwachs, general manager/winemaker at Buttonwood Farm Winery & Vineyard, and the owner/winemaker of Seagrape Wine Company.

She anticipates that the March 8 dinner will be “a kinder and gentler protest” against the current administration.

The theme for the 2017 International Women’s Day is “Be Bold for Change,” according to the website.

“During these turbulent political times, we believe people can come together if we simply sit down at a table with wine and a meal,” said Kathy Joseph, owner and winemaker at Fiddlehead Cellars. “

The beneficiary, the Women’s Fund of Northern Santa Barbara County, a giving circle whereby individuals combine money and/or time so that they can have a bigger impact on the causes most important to them – more so than they would by donating individually.

Since its inception in 2007, the organization has given an average $104,000 back to the community every year, according to its website.

International Women’s Day has been celebrated since 1911.

Copyright Central Coast Wine Press for www.centralcoastwinepress.com

 

 

Lompoc’s Lepiane Wines honors owner Alison Thomson’s Italian heritage

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Alison Thomson with her wines at JCR Winery in the Lompoc Wine Ghetto.

Following in the footsteps of her great grandfather, an Italian immigrant, Alison Breazeale Thomson produces small lot wines using locally grown Italian grape varietals.

Her label, Lepiane, (“Lay-Pee-on-ay”), translates to “the plain” in Italian, Thomson said.

Her winery honors her great grandfather, Luigi A. Lepiane, a native of Piane Crati in Calabria, Italy, who brought his family to California in search of a better life.

He put down roots in California’s Central Valley town of Hollister, where he founded a grocery and, in 1935, a winery, L.A. Lepiane, Thomson notes on her website. During his years as a vintner, Luigi Lepiane produced as many as 1,000 cases of wine each year, Thomson said.

After his death, Thomson’s relatives found blueprints for the construction of both grocery and winery, as well as letterhead for the winery, she said.

Thomson studied biology and Italian at UCSB, and spent a semester abroad in Siena, Italy, where “my love for Italian food and wines turned into a healthy obsession,” she notes on her website, https://lepianewines.com

After graduating from UCSB, Thomson worked at Sunstone Winery, and up in Napa at a tasting room.

From 2004 to 2007, she attended UC Davis to pursue a master’s degree in viticulture. During her studies, Thomson interned for a top winery in Barolo, Italy, further deepening her love of all things Italian.

In the ensuing years, back on the West Coast, Thomson married George, and in 2008 was hired as assistant winemaker at Palmina Wines in Lompoc, where she remained until 2011.

Thomson and her husband are parents to Julia and Mick.

Later in 2011, Thomson migrated to SAMsARA Wines for an assistant winemaking position, and honed her winemaking skills with owner/winemaker Chad Melville.

Italians endeavor to marry food and wine and conversation. It’s obvious speaking with Thomson that the years she’s spent focused on Italian varietals have influenced her winemaking style.

Thomson’s current and soon-to-be released wines.

In 2013, using Barbera grapes purchased from Palmina owner Steve Clifton, Thomson launched Lepiane Wines. Today, she produces small amounts of the Italian grape varietals Barbera and Nebbiolo, as well as grenache.

“Barbera is a great grape because of its acidity and versatility,” she noted.

She would like to pursue bottling an Italian white wine — with either Fiano or Greco grapes — as well, Thomson said.

“Santa Barbara County is great for growing these Italian varietals,” she added.

Her Barbera grapes hail from Walker Vineyard, located on Alamo Pintado Road across from Honea Vineyard, Thomson said. The grenache she sources from Black Oak Vineyard, and Nebbiolo from Sisquoc Vineyard.

Thomson’s 2013 Nebbiolo was bottled just last August; she plans to release it early this year. I found this wine to be an intriguing mix of rose and floral perfume notes, yet also very masculine on the palate.

With total production of less than 300 cases annually, Thomson can easily be considered the smallest of the small labels in Santa Barbara County.

She utilizes some whole cluster fermentation, neutral oak and only native yeasts in her production, she said.

Her wine barrels share the Lompoc Ghetto winery facility of Jalama Cañon Ranch Vineyard, where Thomson is also the vineyard manager and winemaker.

In addition, she oversees another vineyard in the Santa Ynez Valley, and winemaking for a client in Montecito.

Copyright Central Coast Wine Press for www.centralcoastwinepress.com

 

 

Several of Santa Barbara County’s pioneering winemakers to participate in panel at Museum of Natural History

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Six of Santa Barbara County’s pioneering winemakers will be panelists this Sunday afternoon during the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History’s final wine event of 2016.

“In the Beginning: The Early Years in the Santa Barbara Wine Country,” will feature winemakers Jim Clendenen (Au Bon Climat); Fred Brander (Brander Vineyards); Ken Brown (Ken Brown Wines); Bob Lindquist (Qupe); Lane Tanner (Lumen Wines) and Rick Longoria (Longoria Wines)

The moderator will be Antonio Gardella, a longtime Santa Barbara resident who has devoted much of his life to selling wine and educating the public about the joys of the vine.

Following the hour-long Q&A session will be socializing and tastings from 10 local wineries, as well as food from six vendors. Guests will have the opportunity to mingle with participating winemakers.

Clendenen: Robert Parker named Clendenen to his short list of “Best Wineries in the World” in 1989 and 1990, and in 1991, the latter was selected by Oz Clark as one of 50 creators of the world’s “Modern Classic Wines.” In the years since, multiple other awards have followed, and Clendenen continues to produce ABC, as well as several smaller labels, from the production facility he shares with Lindquist on Bien Nacido Vineyards in Santa Maria. Clendenen’s tasting room is in Santa Barbara.

Brander: While he is well documented as producing the best sauvignon blanc in California, Brander puts as much effort into small lots of several red Bordeaux grape varietals, among them cabernet sauvignon and merlot. He recently celebrated the 40th harvest at his estate vineyard/winery/tasting room in the new Los Olivos District — Santa Barbara County’s newest American Viticultural Area — and yes, he was a driving force behind getting recognition for that appellation.

Brown: This vintner was among the first to recognize Santa Barbara County’s potential as a powerhouse for pinot noir and chardonnay, especially in the cooler Santa Maria Valley and Sta. Rita Hills’ AVAs. That was in the mid- to late-1970s. Brown and Lindquist were also the first to plant and produce, respectively, the syrah grape, in this county (at Zaca Mesa). Brown’s tasting room is in Buellton.

Lindquist: This winemaker has been producing award-winning Rhone grape varietal wines on the Central Coast since the early 1980s, among them grenache, viognier, roussanne, marsanne and, of course, syrah. Lindquist and Brown earned reputations for being the earliest winemakers to believe that syrah would become one of this county’s most widely planted varietals. A longtime Los Angeles Dodgers’ fan, Lindquist bottled a chardonnay and a syrah for the team and the public, releasing them to accolades and national press early this year.

Tanner: Along with Clendenen, Brown and many others, Tanner believes that the Santa Maria Valley is one of the hottest cool-climate spots for pinot noir and chardonnay wines — those that make the world sit up and pay attention. Tanner’s first vintage was in 1981, as an enologist for Firestone. Later winemaking gigs included Zaca Mesa and the Hitching Post, and in 1989, she founded her own Lane Tanner Wines label. Tanner’s latest project is Lumen Wines, a label she co-owns with Will Henry, owner of Pico in Los Alamos with his wife, Kali Kopley.

Longoria: “From the very beginning of my career,” Longoria says, “I felt that the Santa Barbara wine region had the potential to produce world-class wines, and it’s been very gratifying to see that belief realized over the more than 30 years I’ve been here. It’s also been very rewarding to have had the good fortune over the years to have some of my wines contribute to the acclaim of our wine region.” Longoria’s winery and tasting room are located in Lompoc.

Details on Sunday: Event takes place from 1 to 5 p.m. in the Fleischmann Auditorium at the Mission Creek campus of the museum, located at 2559 Puesta del Sol in Santa Barbara.

Tickets, limited to 100, are $75 for museum members and $100 for non-members, and remain available at www.sbnature.org/tickets

For more information, contact Meridith Moore, (805) 682-4711, Ext. 112, or mmoore@sbnature2.org

About the museum: Founded in 1916, the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History reconnects more than 100,000 people each year to nature both indoors and out. The Museum has 10 indoor exhibit halls that focus on regional natural history, including astronomy, birds, insects, geology, mammals, marine life, paleontology, plant life and the Chumash Indians.

The museum is also home to the only full-dome planetarium on the Central Coast, a research library, and the John & Peggy Maximus Art Gallery.

The Museum’s outdoor exhibit experiences include a nature trail, the Chumash Sukinanik’oy Garden, The Museum Backyard & Nature Club House, the Butterfly Pavilion — and a real 74-foot Blue Whale skeleton, which is visible from the road and turns quite a few heads.

The Museum’s outdoor nature experience at its Sea Center located on the historic Stearns Wharf. This facility provides the nearly 100,000 people who visit it annually a window to ocean life in the Santa Barbara Channel via interactive exhibits and close-up, hands-on encounters with sea creatures.

Copyright Central Coast Wine Press for www.centralcoastwinepress.com

 

Venerable Central Coast Wine Classic grows into Santa Barbara County for 31st year

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WineClassicLogo-2016-date-hiOne of the Central Coast’s most enduring wine events and a major fundraiser for several nonprofits in two counties will this year expand into Santa Barbara County when it opens Wednesday, Aug. 10.

The Central Coast Wine Classic, now in its 31st year, comprises 18 events over the course of five days. Among those events are barrel tastings, live and silent auctions, symposiums, dinners, lunches and special tours and wine tastings.

One of most popular events is the Thursday dinner at Hearst Castle in San Simeon. That event is $1,250 per person.

The Wine Classic opens Aug. 10 with a barrel tasting of an array of California wineries from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Greengate Ranch & Vineyard in the Edna Valley, and culminates with a sold-out VIP Champagne Louis Roederer & Black Caviar Brunch in Santa Barbara at Stella Mare’s.

The dinner at San Simeon' Hearst Castle is one of the most popular CCWC events

CCWC photo/ The dinner at San Simeon’ Hearst Castle is one of the most popular CCWC events

As of last week, at least seven of the 19 events had already sold out, including the final brunch, all of the Friday evening dinners and the Edna Valley tour, also on Friday, said a CCWC organizer.

Archie McLaren is the founder of chairman of CCWC, and relocated almost two years ago to downtown Santa Barbara after residing in San Luis Obispo County for decades.

His employees say he holds the history of the CCWC in his head.

“I’m trying to be an extension of Archie’s brain” when it comes to organizing the multiday event, said Beverly Aho, one of McLaren’s employees since 2006 and a resident of Avila Beach.

Her colleague Robin Bort, who resides in Reno, calls McLaren “such a pleasure to work with. He’s one of the most talented people I’ve ever met, and is very kind and generous.”

Aho and Bord both volunteered for CCWC (Bort for 20 years and Aho for 10) before McLaren hired them to assist him with event organization and production. While they’ve been colleagues for more than a decade and work closely via e-mail and phone, the two women have “never met” in person, Aho chuckled.

Bort, her husband and a group of others teamed to found the annual Live Oak Festival that takes place in June at Live Oak Camp along the Santa Ynez River, she said. The Live Oak Festival continues to benefit KCBX to this day.

Bort is a graphic designer who just completed her 31st version of the annual catalog that showcases the live auction items available during the event.

There are 52 lots in the current catalog, viewable here at http://www.centralcoastwineclassic.org/live-auction.php

The lots are “a mix of lifestyle items and wine and are very unique,” Bort told me.

The Wine Classic caters to guests “from all over the world” who help fund Central Coast nonprofits with their auction purchases, Aho said.

She and McLaren personally speak to every potential guest interested in event attendance, she said, adding that organizers strive to offer “personalized assistance” to help guests decide which event is best suited to their tastes.

The centralcoastwineclassic.org website clearly states: “We do not offer online registration. You are more than a computerized payment to us. You are a valued guest!”

Guests will be transported to, from and between events via a fleet of buses, Aho said. (“Our bus schedule is crazy!”)

To reach Aho for tickets or additional information, call her at (805) 235-8130, or inquire via e-mail at sylphie333@yahoo.com.

While in its early days the CCWC was a fundraiser solely for KCBX-Central Coast Public Radio, more recently it has boosted the coffers of multiple nonprofit organizations in both counties.

Since 2004 when the Central Coast Wine Classic Foundation was created, CCWC has raised a whopping $2.5 million for 125 organizations that focus on studio arts, performing arts and healing arts, according to a news release.

Among the beneficiaries for 2016 are the Hearst Preservation and the Friends of Hearst Castle Foundation, the Léni Fé Bland Performing Arts Fund and the Boys & Girls Club of Northern San Luis Obispo.

Among the highlights of the 2014 live auction lots: 60 bottles of fine French red Burgundy that sold for $35,000; a 2014 harvest dinner for 24 people that was presented by Au Bon Climat and the Buellton Hitching Post restaurant, $24,000; a wine and culinary tour of French wine country for two people, $20,000; a dinner with McLaren and baseball legend Tim McCarver and a dozen bottles of rare wine, all the 1984 vintage, for $20,000; and a gourmet food & wine cruise for two from Singapore to Hong Kong for $15,000, according to publicist Maureen McFadden, handling media for McLaren for the fist time this year.

Copyright Central Coast Wine Press for www.centralcoastwinepress.com

 

 

Bacon & Barrels’ opening night dinner showcased local fare, bacon, Biddle Ranch

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More, please? Best.appetizer.ever, this was candied bacon "cracker" with feta, herbs and grapefruit

More, please? Best.appetizer.ever, this was candied bacon “cracker” with feta, herbs and grapefruit

Bacon. Love it … or not. Actually, I am not acquainted with anyone who doesn’t eat good bacon like the end of the world is near.

I even have a friend who married a vegetarian and eliminated all meat from her diet. But here and there, she still indulges in bacon, because it’s the one thing she cannot live without.

To be clear, I don’t consume much bacon at home, but it’s a staple when I dine out.

And so I dined well at the VIP (“Very Important Pig”) dinner last Friday that kicked off the Bacon & Barrels celebration, held this year for the first time in San Luis Obispo County.

That evening took place at Biddle Ranch Vineyard, located on the road of the same name, just off Highway 227/Edna Valley Road.

Ryan Deovlet (of Deovlet Wines, and also of Refugio Ranch Wines) has been the winemaker at Biddle Ranch since the 2014 vintage. Chef Maegen Loring crafted the meal. She’s the owner of Maegen Loring Catering and a longtime favorite on the Central Coast for her knack pairing area wines with fresh, local fare.

The Biddle Ranch winery’s tasting room is surrounded by ample outdoor space that Bacon & Barrels’ staff put to good use that evening. The walled-in side yard, deck and courtyard protected us from the afternoon breezes as we commenced with appetizers and wines.

B&B Menu 7.15.16

First up was the Biddle Ranch 2015 Rosé, a delicate but flavorful blend of 60 percent sangiovese and 40 percent syrah. Soon making the rounds were paper cones full of popcorn dusted with chicharrones dust, a finger-licking delight when paired with the rosé.

Next in line came my favorite for the evening: Candied bacon “cracker” with whipped feta cheese, grapefruit and herbs. By this time, some of us had estate chardonnay in our glasses, which also married with this delightful bite of rich herbs plus savory bacon. Pure deliciousness.

The first course, steamed clams with butterbeans, pancetta, orange aioli and oregano showcased the freshest clams soaked with essence of orange and bacon sauce. The accompanying wine was the Biddle Ranch 2014 pinot grigio.

Then came second: Flatbread topped with chevre, prosciutto-wrapped beets and pickled greens, and paired with pinot noir.

The evening’s entrée was served with a 2014 syrah and featured bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin with basil mashers and plum-blackberry salad. About those mashers? Yes, they were green, and I had three helpings …

… which meant I had zero room left for dessert: Bourbon-bacon pecan pie with orange caramel.

Other happy diners outside in the evening sun at Biddle Ranch

Other happy diners outside in the evening sun at Biddle Ranch

I appreciated Loring’s effort to keep the dinner “family style,” which for me translates to smaller servings all around. When meals are plated, one often ends up with too much food, which means we often overeat, and/or food gets wasted. Kudos all around to Loring and Holly Holliday, owner of Create Promotions, organizer of Bacon & Barrels.

 

 

Copyright Central Coast Wine Press for www.centralcoastwinepress.com

 

 

 

 

 

San Luis Obispo County’s wine industry to honor leaders at California Mid-State Fair

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The wine industry in San Luis Obispo County comes together every year to recognize members of the region’s wine and viticulture community, and this year, awards will be presented Friday, June 22.

Wolff

Wolff

Peck

Peck

Thomas

Thomas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2016 San Luis Obispo County Wine Industry Awards will be given to Jean-Pierre Wolff, Wolff Vineyards, Industry Person of the Year; Steve Peck, J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines, Winemaker of the Year; and Bob Thomas, Mesa Vineyard Management, Winegrape Grower of the Year.

The Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance — in partnership with the San Luis Obispo Wine Country Association, the Independent Grape Growers of the Paso Robles Area, the Vineyard Team and past award recipients — worked together to identify the 2016 honorees.

His or her peers voted on each nominee for respective leadership and accomplishments across the county, recognized as the state’s third largest wine region.

“Each year the wine community looks forward to the Mid-State Fair as a time we can join our fellow agriculturalists in recognizing our leaders, innovators and visionaries,” said Jennifer Porter, executive director of the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance.

“We are excited to honor these three men whose passion for San Luis Obispo County wine and quest for quality in the vineyard and winery is to be celebrated.”

The San Luis Obispo County Wine Industry Awards event takes place at 5:30 p.m. Friday, July 22, within the Mission Square at the Mid-State Fair.

The event is free (with paid admission to the Mid-State Fair) and the public is encouraged to attend.

Visit www.midstatefair.com for more information.

The Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance represents wineries, growers and businesses in Paso Robles Wine Country, which comprises more than 40,000 vineyard acres and 200 wineries. For more information, visit www.pasowine.com

Copyright Central Coast Wine Press for www.centralcoastwinepress.com

 

 

Popular Bacon & Barrels makes San Luis Obispo debut this weekend, July 15-17

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Bottle Branding photos/Would you like bacon with your drink?

Bacon & Barrels celebrates four years of bacon-inspired food and barrel-aged libations with its San Luis Obispo County debut this weekend, July 15 to 17.

Holly Holliday, founding queen of Bacon & Barrels and owner of San Luis Obispo’s Create Promotions, parent organizer of this event and BubblyFest, relocated the popular event north from its early locations at Saarloos & Sons’ field in Los Olivos in 2013 and 2014, and last year, at Buttonwood Farm Winery & Vineyard outside of Solvang.

In 2014, just one year after launching Bacon & Barrels in Los Olivos, Holliday added a sister event every May since, in San Diego.

Bottle Branding photos/ Like creative food made with bacon? Bacon & Barrels is your new heaven

Bacon- and pork-belly inspired dishes will star this weekend at Bacon & Barrels

While general admission tickets remain available for this Saturday’s event at Madonna Inn Meadows, the coveted VIP (all-weekend access) tickets just sold out.

In the case of Bacon & Barrels, VIP stands for “Very Important Pig,” and guests who partake in that status take it Very Seriously.

VIP attendees will enjoy all three sections of Bacon & Barrels: Friday evening’s kick-off dinner at Biddle Ranch Vineyard House; early admission (noon) to Saturday afternoon’s festival at Madonna Inn Meadows with exclusive access to the lounge; and finally, the Buffet & Bloody’s Sunday Brunch at Sidecar, 1127 Broad St., also in San Luis Obispo.

The tickets that are still available (get yours today, as they will not last) include early-admission (noon to 5 p.m.) for the festival Saturday ($80); general admission (1 to 5 p.m.) ($60); and both categories of the designated non-drinker tickets ($30), for early and regular entry to the Saturday event.

All Saturday tickets include parking, a glass, live music, live chef and mixology demonstrations, and all food samples — while supplies last. You won’t leave hungry.

Those who pay to sample the libations get all of the above — plus everything alcoholic.

About those live demonstrations: Chefs from the hottest restaurants will prepare and proffer small plates starring the most creative forms of (what else) — bacon and pork belly. To pair with the nibbles will be drinks from brewers, winemakers and mixologists, who will offer bacon-inspired and bacon-based libations. You really cannot go wrong here, folks.

The Spazmatics will provide live music Saturday.

For more details on the entire weekend, visit http://www.baconandbarrels.com/schedule-slo/

Holliday notes that Bacon & Barrels is proud to support the Create Community Foundation, which provides grants and assistance to organization that serve at-risk youth. In addition, the festival makes it an annual goat to divert 95 percent of its trash from landfills via cutlery, napkins and cups that are biodegradable and compostible.

Copyright Central Coast Wine Press for www.centralcoastwinepress.com

 

Larner Fête to feature food, music and seven wines from iconic Ballard Canyon vineyard

Winemaker Michael Larner and his family will open their private Ballard Canyon Road estate vineyard from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 24, for the 2016 return of Larner Fête.

Providing the food will be Autostrada Wood Fired Pizza and Amaranto Catering, and musical entertainment will be by the Ruben Lee Dalton Band.

Tickets are $60 and available via www.larnerwine.com

The 2016 Larner Fete will feature seven wineries that source Larner Vineyard grapes. Pouring their wines will be Sonja Magdevski of Casa Dumetz Wines; Scott Sampler of the Central Coast Group Project; Craig Jaffurs of Jaffurs Wine Cellars; Mikael Sigouin of Kaena Wine; Michael Larner of Larner Vineyard & Winery; McPrice “Mac” Myers of McPrice Myers Wines; and Larry Schaffer of tercero wines.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the Viticulture & Enology Program at Allan Hancock College in Santa Maria.

Since it was planted in 1999, the Larner Vineyard has provided grapes to winemakers across the Central Coast and beyond. Most of the wineries that purchased fruit as early as 2001, when the vines were first mature, remain clients of Larner Vineyard today.

More than two dozen winemakers produce wines sourced from the syrah, grenache, mourvedre and viognier grapes grown on the 34-acre estate vineyard.

Larner Fête attendees will be shuttled to the vineyard property from pick-up locations in Solvang and Buellton. Location details will be e-mailed to guests with confirmation of ticket purchase.

For more information, e-mail Emily Shirley Dixon, Emily@larnerwine.com